9 Reasons You'll Never Make It In The Music Business Featured

Saturday, 11 June 2016 09:31 Written by  Published in Music Read 874 times
Adrian Eccleston, one of the judges of Honey Jam 2016 Adrian Eccleston, one of the judges of Honey Jam 2016
It’s about that time of year again, Honey Jam auditions are in full swing.

It's no secret Toronto is home to some really talented artists. For the 21st year in a row, Honey Jam is hosting a nationwide audition for Canadian female artists.

Honey Jam provides women with the opportunity to receive vocal training, industry insight and workshops to educate them on all aspects of the music industry. Honey Jam has provided Canadian talent the opportunity to be seen and judged by extremely successful industry professionals and this year, Adrian Eccleston is one of them.

For those of you who don’t know, Adrian Eccleston is a Grammy Award-winning song writer, singer, musical director and guitarist. He has toured across North America with artists like Drake, The Weeknd, Kylie Minogue and many more. Before signing on to be a judge at this year’s Honey Jam Auditions, Eccleston has been in the audience at Honey Jam auditions and performances for years.
He’s extremely passionate about music and believes there are many factors that can either make or break an upcoming artists’ career. Here are his top 9.

1. You sabotage yourself
When trying to succeed in the music industry, Eccleston believes that one could potentially fail if they suffer from stage fright and shy away from the spotlight. Having stage fright or a lack of stage presence could cause you to miss your opportunity, which in turn, could have been the only big moment you would receive.

2.Unorganized, Unprepared and Tardy
Any responsible adult knows that showing up unprepared to anything just isn’t a good reflection on you and your abilities. As an artist it is imperative to NEVER show up to an audition or performance unorganized or late.

“I see this all the time. There is always someone who loses work because they are never on time.”

3. Unable to command attention while on stage
When performing, Eccleston says that it is very important that an artist is able to not only capture the audience’s attention but keep it.

4. You are only knowledgeable in one aspect of the business
It is crucial to not only know the ins and outs of your career, but to ALSO know the ins and outs about the industry as a whole.

“Most artists don't realize how much is involved in the music business. There are many things to know and that takes time and dedication. In the music industry you are constantly learning new things. Over time you learn that organization is very important. Pay attention to all of the roles and jobs involved in a music career. Also, knowing how to put on a great show takes a lot of practise and a good team of people working together.”

5. You think you already have what it takes
Being confident is great but never stop practising and trying to improve your art.

“There are many things an artist has to do on a daily basis. I look for someone with a good head on their shoulders. More than anything you need time to develop a great artist.”

6. You have no originality
Finding your creative style can be hard for any new artist but being true to who you are can help you to stand out and become a successful musician.

“Be your own artist. Don't copy other people. Be creative. That usually helps people get where they are going the best way possible. Just by being creative and original.”

7. Terrible attitude and Unappreciative
If you are not humble and respectful, no one will want to work with you, especially if you have not yet made a name for yourself within the industry.

“Don’t take the people who help you on a daily basis for granted, and be respectful to all the good people you meet.”

8. Self-Doubt
Pressure to conform is all around us. In the music industry you may be confronted with a situation where someone wants to change your style, your sound or your work, so that you can become marketable in their eyes. It is important to always stay true to your art and stand up for what you believe in.

“Don't listen to anyone but your own intuition (gut).”

9. You aren’t networking daily
Networking has always been an extremely important part of self-branding. If you are not out there connecting with people, how will they be able to hear what you have to offer?

“I got my break in music by hanging out in the live music clubs and meeting people in the industry that would go to these places. On a weekly basis, you could go to a few clubs, mostly on College Street and Queen Street to network with dozens of people in the music industry. I started out by joining a band called Blaxam who introduced me to the world of Toronto live music. From there I went on to play with many record company bands. I remember once walking passed Haydain Neale from Jacksoul in a rehearsal room and he simply said “Hey we have a gig next week what are you doing?” 

This year’s Honey Jam finalists will be announced July 1st. And the final showcase takes place Thursday August 11 in Toronto. Click here for more info.

Last modified on Thursday, 16 June 2016 17:50
LC Kemp

Lataevia-Ceianna Kemp is a graduate of the Journalism advanced diploma program at Centennial College. While studying there she worked part-time in the AV technical department and hosted two radio shows. She most recently interned at 680 News, wrote for the East York  and Toronto Observer and Narcity Toronto.

LC keeps busy by hosting two Youtube shows, designing/managing TH Real Estate Services website and social media accounts, all while attending ballet classes at The National Ballet Of Canada. Her focus is on ballet, entertainment, lifestyle, travel and anything news related.

Twitter: @xxxoolc

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