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Byron Armstrong

Byron Armstrong

I think I have potential. I say this knowing exactly how much of an arrogant so and so it makes me sound. As a full-time freelance writer, my work has popped up in publications of all sizes and influence, in which I’ve expressed political opinions from a critical perspective, along with a rare smattering of nuanced art and book reviews.

Gordon Shadrach is a portrait artist, Grade 2 teacher, and public speaker. His work has shown at the Royal Ontario Museum, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia to name a few. As a self-taught painter, it’s even more impressive that he’s been selected by OCAD University as a lecturer at its How We Paint series. Prior to that engagement, ByBlacks spoke to the artist about the themes he explores through his art, the challenges of breaking through institutional barriers as an emerging artist at age 53, and what he most hopes to impart in his upcoming talk at the university.

ByBlacks Review: BBBB*

Since 2001, the ReelWorld Film Festival has been showcasing and connecting BIPOC (Black Indigenous People Of Colour) filmmakers as an antidote to the lack of diversity and representation in the film industry.

“I’m not a businessman. I’m a business, man.” - Jay-Z (Diamonds From Sierra Leone Remix)

“Rainbow capitalism.” This occurs once a year when corporate brands focus on LGBTQ representation in order to sell products to that community and its supporters.

Christopher Sealy is not a glass half full kind of guy. After diving head first into French language and literature, and spending 2 years as both a cultural observer and participant of Parisian life, he went back home to Toronto inspired to become a sommelier. 

Frances-Anne Solomon is an artistic force to be reckoned with. As the director of CaribbeanTales and the International Film festival of the same name, she has grown the entity into a globally recognized institution that gives voice to filmmakers throughout the Caribbean diaspora.

Dr. Kenneth Montague is a well known dentist, curator, and respected collector of works by local and International contemporary African artists. He works behind the scenes in Toronto's art world as one of the AGO's Board of Trustees, and as founding director of Wedge Curatorial Projects; a not-for-profit arts organization that supports Black emerging artists.

For the last 20 years, photographer and new media artist Wayne Dunkley has been asking people in urban centres to confront negative perceptions and biases around Black identity. His latest project, #whatdoyoufeelwhen, is an interactive work of public art that prompts for honest reactions to thousands of images of his face postered in four major cities across Canada.

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