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Rosey Edeh

Rosey Edeh

There’s an ambitious docu-series on YouTube titled ‘This Far’. The 30 episode project features successful Canadian immigrants and first-generation Canadians. Each episode runs about 10 minutes long and offers an in-depth- yet not overbearing- gaze into the subject’s trials, tribulations and triumphs of living and growing in Canada. It’s the exquisite, personal story told in 30 unique ways. The chilled background beat along with quick cuts and colloquial graphics perhaps offers a hint as to who’s behind the series.

(PHOTO: Joe Sherlock, owner of Celebrity Vegetarian Restaurant) A construction site with seemingly limitless orange cones, detour signs, cranes and large pulsating machinery has now become part of the cityscape along a good chunk of Eglinton Avenue in Toronto. The development of the Crosstown LRT has turned the historic area known as Little Jamaica (which runs from Allen road, west to Keele Street along Eglinton Avenue) into a virtual shuttle run for cars and an obstacle course for pedestrians.

(Photo: Kimani Peter captured by Latoya Powell/Ryersonian) A meeting of beats, hearts and minds is set to emerge online July 4 thanks to Kimani Peter, founder of LOUD.army, a music technology startup. The 27-year-old bespectacled Brampton, Ontario resident has spent most of his waking hours these past several weeks building a virtual stage for Black artists and Black activists to thrive and vibe during the third iteration of UP2SUMIN.

“Breathe out, breathe in American oxygen Every breath I breathe Chasin' this American Dream”

The vast space between myself and Radio DJ, promoter, manager and entrepreneur Carrie Mullings does nothing to dampen her formidable presence. Even through our video call, her full, deep voice emanates with authority and fills the room.

For almost a century, a red brick edifice - with its smokestack looming tall - has sat at the southern edge of the downtown Toronto neighborhood now known as Harbourfront. Built in 1926, it first served as an equipment warehouse. In 1987, the empty warehouse became The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery and has since featured the works of hundreds of world-renowned artists such as John Akomfrah and Steve McQueen.

“Utopia Falls, I call it my love letter to hip hop, to the hip hop culture. It takes a couple of my loves and smashes them together which is always a good thing. I’m kind of a sci-fi geek. I’m a comic book geek. I’m a genre geek. I love all that kind of stuff with mythology built in and then we obviously have our mythology with hip hop. I hadn’t really seen my culture portrayed in the future.”

The Negroes Are Congregating is a relentless, in your face, mélange of sketch, vignette and spoken word that takes you to church and into the Black psyche living with anti-Black racism, all without missing a beat. The play is intricate, funny, contemplative, and incredibly fast-paced.

A long-suffering Black maid living in 1963 Louisiana is stuck in a world she despises. Through a rainbow of musical genres, powerful life lessons and emotional evolution the musical Caroline, Or Change, offers universal resonance.

Montreal born, Edmonton raised actor Dion Johnstone has been preparing for his latest role since he was a child. “My first introduction to Shakespeare was through comic books. There were these series of comics produced in the ’60s, early ’70s called Classics Illustrated and funny enough, the first comic book I read, was Julius Caesar. I loved it because I was reading the language and able to connect with the visuals and the fear of the language was taken care of really early.”

 

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