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    Byron Armstrong

    Byron Armstrong

    Dr. Andrea Fatona is an independent curator and an associate professor at the Ontario College of Art and Design University who is concerned with issues of equity within the sphere of the arts and the educational potential of artworks produced by Black Canadians to articulate broader perspectives of Canadian identities.

    Transit, the word modern urban centres like Toronto use to describe our public transportation, is a short form cousin to the word, transition.

    "Diversity our strength." It's the official motto of Toronto, Canada’s largest city, and is meant to represent the myriad of voices housed within its metropolitan barriers.

    “Having a Black arts centre is about being able to have this place where all of us, from our respective places in the diaspora and identities we bring with that, can have this space where we connect, have a sense of belonging, and share that unique experience for cultural exchange through the arts.” -Alica Hall (Executive Director - Nia Centre for the Arts)

    Nehassaiu deGannes expresses her artistic practice through the worlds of both theatre and poetry. A natural-born storyteller, she follows in the tradition of African griots who used ancestral memory, physical movement, vocal presence, and the power of language, to engage with their communities. Covid-19’s far-reaching impact has included a gutting of the global arts community, and its impact on the theatre world has been no less demoralizing.

    “Over 2 million of the 12 million associated with the transatlantic slave trade died en route. In effect, what you’re looking at is a crime scene.” Kramer Wimberley

    “Art is the physical representation of feeling.” Jaylah Hall Possessing wisdom beyond her years, wunderkind Jaylah Hall knew from the age of 12 who she was, and what she wanted to be. Preadolescence isn’t usually a time when most people can boast enough of self-awareness to know that their uniqueness isn’t a handicap; especially when you’re Black.

    (Photo by: Marie-Anne Letarte) In Canada, we pay a lot of lip service to our brand of multicultural mosaic, usually without an understanding that the mosaic extends beyond just language or skin colour. It’s the “culture” within that “cultural mosaic” that causes the most trouble between different camps in society, (particularly when a certain camp considers themselves the native culture to which all others must assimilate). Manuel Mathieu asks the viewer to consider that our worlds are interconnected in ways that they may have never considered.

    Bio Photo: Courtesy Sarah Martin Nathan Eugene Carson is a multifaceted, multidisciplinary artist, whose trajectory has been less dictated by the hierarchical confines of what an artist is supposed to do, and more guided by an intuitive understanding of what an artist is supposed to be. Carson brings the same freedom of thought and expression encouraged by his creative familial upbringing into his first major solo exhibition at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery.

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